• QuadriLiteral@programming.dev
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      10 days ago

      If you don’t want compilation to take all cores, use one or two cores less for the compile. I frequently compile C++ code, almost always I just let it max out 100%, haven’t been really bothered by the lag. When I’m in a teams meeting for instance it can cause noticable lag so then I do ninja -n 8 or ninja -n 12 and problem solved.

      • SorteKaninA
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        10 days ago

        I have actually tried this solution as well and I had to reduce the compilation jobs to like 4 (usually would be 16 with my 16 logical cpus) before it helped any. That is simply too much of a reduction to be worth it, it makes compilation take ages.

        And in the end, that’s still just a workaround to the more general problem that is the fact that the desktop environment and user input is not prioritised in the scheduler, when it really should. I really want Linux to succeed so it pains me to see Windows do better in this situation.

        • QuadriLiteral@programming.dev
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          10 days ago

          Huh odd, I guess it depends quite heavily on the system? Just to check I cleaned my build folder and am building now, ~700 files that take around 5 minutes to compile. I don’t notice a thing, CPU (Ryzen 7 7700X ) is fully maxed out. I know that I do notice it on my laptop, but there reducing from 16 to 12 or even 14 is enough. Having to reduce to 4 is very different from what I experience. Currently on manjaro, the laptop has ubuntu.

          • SorteKaninA
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            10 days ago

            Hmm curious. I guess I might need to investigate more