• TDCN
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    3 months ago

    Maybe if human Call centers upped the quality to something useful maybe they would not be so replaceable

    • Ultragigagigantic@lemmy.world
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      3 months ago

      The poor quality is a benefit to these shitter corporations.

      Oh sure you can get a refund, just go through customer service hell. It’s all about that 1-10% group of people who give up and relent to the corporations infinite hunger for money.

      If customer service wasn’t experiencing "unprecedented " call volume, people would be more willing to get their rightful conflict resolution.

    • yourgodlucifer@lemmy.world
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      3 months ago

      That would require these companies to treat customer service staff like human beings so they don’t keep quitting after a month or end up being dead inside. They don’t want to do that so robots it is!

      Working in a call center sucks so much ass I’ve worked for more than one they have all tried to prevent me from using the restroom your job is to get yelled at all day in back to back phone calls everything you do is timed tracked and monitored and they do not want you to take one minute off the phones for any reason.

    • Peffse@lemmy.world
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      3 months ago

      Two of the best call centers I’ve ever worked with would be Google Fiber and Intel. Both of which are probably terrible now.

      (2015) Google Fiber actually had people who understood networking, understood my personal setup, and understood what tests I had already performed to diagnose that my issue with their equipment. No faffing about with a script, I gave them my test results and got an appointment for a replacement line in like, 15 minutes, and an immediate credit on the account.

      (2009) Back when Intel made rock-solid vanilla motherboards I did a dumb and accidentally disabled legacy USB on my board, which meant that I couldn’t press F2/DEL to get back into BIOS. I called Intel, gave them the troubleshooting steps I already ran (including jumper BIOS reset), and the call center forwarded me to the engineer who designed the motherboard. He whipped up and sent a bootable CD-ROM image to update the BIOS back to default and then updated all future revisions to avoid my issue.

      I wish every call center was that good.