In the US it’s not crazy for kids maybe as young as 6 to make themselves sandwiches like a PB&J/Ham & Cheese either if parents have an emergency, or to take to lunch for themselves because parents didn’t have time. (Or you know, they’re neglectful)

So is there a go to food for children to make in other cultures?

EDIT: Sorry for phrasing it like teaching 6 year olds to cook is mainly to help parents. Personal experience of dad going to prison and mom working 12 hour days at early age shined through. So me being taught to cook wasn’t “This is a skill that’ll be useful as you grow older” but instead was a “Things are going to be rough, and sometimes things won’t work out with me being there when I need too, and I want you to be able to be okay in an emergency”. So cooked myself food when I was little probably a lot more than others, then when I was a teenager I was cooking dinner for the family a lot.

But makes sense it wasn’t the case for others! Still the curious, what other cultures teach their children to cook!

  • @bstix
    link
    English
    19
    edit-2
    3 months ago

    Traditional Danish lunch is rye bread with a variety of spreadings, sliced sausages and patés. Think of a simpler kind of smorgasbord (depending on the content in your fridge). There’s a lot of traditional combinations all based on a thin sliced rye bread with butter, the main spread and often one or two toppings that go with the spread.

    The kids learn to make these kinds of “sandwiches” in kindergarten, and it comes in handy when they get older and come home from school hungry.

    It makes for a more varied choice than toast or jam sandwiches.

    Examples: https://imgur.com/a/ZgGGUhy

    • zout
      link
      fedilink
      33 months ago

      There’s no rye bread with herring in your photo, the Danish don’t eat that? The Dutch do, topped with some chopped onions. Though my kids don’t like rye bread, it is getting old fashioned over here.

      • @bstix
        link
        English
        4
        edit-2
        3 months ago

        Curry-pickled herring with raw onion and caper on rye is the first dish served on our traditional Christmas lunch. Served with snaps.

        Fish generally don’t go to well in a lunchbox. The most common are mackerel in tomato with mayonnaise and cod roe with rémoulade, but most kids would frown at it. Also, it requires a fork and knife to eat. The traditional lunch box sandwiches are made to be eaten by hand.

        I just found some random photo from the web. Apparently it’s difficult to find a photo of our common lunchbox hand-served-rye-bread-open-sandwiches. Most are of restaurant high topped “smørrebrød”, which also requires knife and fork.